WeCycle, Melbourne

SB has been volunteering at WeCycle in Northcote, Melbourne since July 2019. It is a volunteer-run initiative enabled by small grants, Council support, and volunteer mechanics and fixers. Craig Jackson and Gayle Ilievski set it up in 2016. Donated bikes are re-homed to  refugees and asylum seekers referred by caseworkers from support agencies. Other bike find good homes too, through sales or donations and there is occasionally space for people to fix their bikes. WeCycle is one of a number of Melbourne bike workshops set up more recently than the original Bike Shed at CERES. WeCycle usually staffed 10-3 Saturdays in Batman Park off St George’s Road. http://www.wecycle-melbourne.com/

 

 

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Funding received 2019

Batterbury SPJ, D. Mateo-Babiano. 2019-20. Comparative evaluation of community bicycle workshops in Australia, France and UK: supporting  low carbon urban transport,  individual wellbeing, community economies, and cycling cultures. Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute (MSSI) Future Cities Seed Funding. AU$9,600.

This project aims to explore and compare the contribution of community bike workshops [CBWs , ‘bike kitchens’ or ateliers vélos,] in Europe and Australia to creating a cycling culture, and better wellbeing and transport outcomes in different city-regions. We will use the 3Is (i.e. ideas, interests and institutions) as a comparative evaluation framework to appraise urban community bike workshops as nodes of low carbon urban transport, as contributors to individual wellbeing, better and vibrant community economies, and shapers of cycling cultures.

  1. How do selected bike workshops create demand for urban cycling? How are they challenging mainstream mobilities through active  urban transportation ?
  2. What are the major motivations and governance arrangements of these community  workshops?  With what political and other alliances?
  3. Test the counterfactual:  are they simply offering a service to the poor and to bike enthusiasts, permitting them to save money and build/maintain a ride?
  4. Are workshops ‘prefiguring’ the low carbon future? As many workshops transition into having salaried employees and more secure premises, are there lessons for urban practice, community economies research, and transition theory?

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2017 study of workshops in France

A key source came out in 2017, based on a  French survey.

Meixner, E.  2017. Etude d’évaluation sur les services vélos – Enquête sur les ateliers d’autoréparation de vélos. ADEME [ADEME did one just on bike workshops. This is a key source.] https://www.heureux-cyclage.org/IMG/pdf/cahier_ateliers_autoreparation-services_velos_ademe-2017.pdf

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Workshops in Quebec

http://www.velo.qc.ca/transport-actif/ABC-du-transport-actif-/Ateliers-communautaires

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List of workshops in California

https://calbike.org/bicycling-in-california/community_bike_shops/ch

we visited three in March April 2016, all in San Francisco.

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MP3 of radio interview on community bike workshops, 17 Aug. 2015.

Simon talks about community bike workshop at 3CR radio, 17 Aug 2015

http://www.3cr.org.au/yarrabug/episode-201508171000/community-bike-workshops-their-contribution-justice-sustainable-urban

And a talk on 18th Aug 2015

https://events.unimelb.edu.au/events/5600-community-bike-workshops-their-contribution-to-justice-sustainable-urban-transport

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Two Berlin workshops

A constant complaint in Brussels volunteer workshops is the lack of stable premises to operate. I even helped one of them ‘move house’ last month. Last weekend in Berlin I managed to visit two workshops, and found both had stable premises. The ADFC Werkstatt, Berlin-Mitte, is situated in the ADFC Berlin headquarters. ADFC is the everyday cyclists organisation, with about 150,000 members. They offer insurance to members, publish guides and maps, etc. The workshop was given its space at the back of the building for free, along with financial assistance to buy tools and stands, and has a moderate range of opening hours. The front has  a bookshop and a few bike parts for sale too. The workshop has pretty much every tool on hand except welding gear. The volunteer we talked to has been working there 13 years, and the workshop is older than that. Non-members of ADFC are welcome and they just take donations and the costs of parts from them. The workshop can afford this because they do not have major outgoings. Arriving on Friday, it was busy. Bike security engraving was also going on. It was nice to see some older, expert mechanics at work.

A second workshop was the Fahrradwerkstatt in the Regenbogenfabrik, in hipster-alternative Kreuzberg (photo on right). This is a legalised former squat, run as a collective, with several activities in the buildings including a cinema, restaurant, and woodworking studio. You pay at least E3 a session plus parts, and as at ADFC, often have to work on your bike outside when it is crowded. The space is stable (gone are the days of housing battles with the police in the 1980s), and the precise nature of labour (volunteer or paid) I am still not sure about, since they were really busy when I was there. They have bike hire and some other paying activities.

Berlin was extremely interesting. Good road treatments for bikes (but certainly not everywhere, and some lanes are pretty ropey), decent junctions designs, masses of bikes around (unlike Brussels, modal share has reached over 10%). Nobody wears a helmet and the city is moderately flat. Different bike hire possibilities at shops, and also citybikes. I am sure it is grimmer in winter!  There are other workshops, but weekend hours are very limited so I could not visit – maybe this is just not a tradition there, to be open at weekends. One workshop I really wanted to interview, Bike Aid Berlin offering bikes just to refugees and people without papers, closed its doors semi-permanently before I could get there, following a vigorous debate about its identity politics and mission.

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